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Mobile Industry Review Show – Episode 25

Episode Twenty-Five hits your screens this morning from Charlotte Mews, just off Charlotte Street — centre of Her Majesty’s Media Empire. There’s a heck of a lot of advertising and media companies based in the area. And a very nice Pizza Express that I have frequented for years.

Originally we were aiming to record the episode from the Mobyko party — but due to a clash of schedules (they’ve changed their party to this week, we’re alas, not all in the country next week), we had to find another location.

Instead of roughing it out in the city of London, we selected an office. Dan’s new office, actually. (They’ve taken some space courtesy of mobile marketing geniuses, Sponge Group — one of their co-founders features in the opening credits actually). We were thus mercifully free of wind noise, chavvy girls trying to get on TV and general street hubbub. As a result, we haven’t any normob-walkabouts this time.

But we’ve got something better: Dan Lane and James Whatley arsing about trying to get a Poloroid PoGo mobile photo printer to work. ( 08:53 )

They both steadfastly refused to read the graphical instructions (James wavered now and again) and for a good 50 minutes or so, pressed buttons, slammed fists, criticised Nokia’s Bluetooth implementation — and so on — as the Poloroid refused to work. ( 10:28 )

That is, until we actually gave it a full 15 minute charge. Then it worked perfectly. ( 13:59 )

We filmed the whole shebang and it is a magical RTFM tour de force. (Read the flocking manual).

Special Guest this week is Ed Hodges. Ed kindly stood in for Ben, despite — monentarily — forgetting Ben’s surname. (“It’s Smith!” screamed Dan at a slightly peturbed Ed, “It’s the most generic surname, how can you forget Smith?”)

We’ve also got a cameo from Phoneboy (AKA Dameon — see if you can spot him), we try out the Cellranger Cell Booster ( 03:05 ), James explains how the N78 requires him to carry just one phone nowadays ( 19:44 ) , Ed explains his upcoming special-assignment for MIR ( 04:42 ), Dan compliments Phoload.com ( 18:33 ), there are some competitions, we have some brief Sony Ericsson news ( 06:20 )and we check out some Nokia mobile speakers ( 06:53 ).

Plus: A lot of people simply don’t believe me when I tell them that Dan Lane has got a RFID chip embedded in his arm. This week we prove it. He uses his wrist and and RFID sensor to unlock his computer in a live demonstration. ( 16:49 )

Watch out for James Whatley riding passenger on a motorcycle too. ( 22:17 )

We’ve got all the feeds properly in iTunes now. Do a search for Mobile Industry Review and you should find them there. Or if you like, lift the feeds or actual files from the links below:

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By Ewan

Ewan is Founder and Editor of Mobile Industry Review. He writes about a wide variety of industry issues and is usually active on Twitter most days. You can read more about him or reach him with these details.

37 replies on “Mobile Industry Review Show – Episode 25”

Thanks for using my videos, chaps. Maybe I can get myself in front of the Nokia office I work for in a couple weeks! 🙂

I'd be tickled if I was the random person who won the Cellranger.

Thanks for the great words on Phoload. We'll be adding support for the smartphone platforms soon. Even though J2ME is not so sexy any more, I think for now, the majority of downloads on Phoload are likely to be for J2ME rather than Smartphone software, based on the sheer volume of J2ME phones out there.

I need to get some of those speakers for my Nokia E51 (great phone, terrible speakers!)

Just a quick word on batteries, and *why* these things tell you to charge them before use.
Rechargeable batteries (no matter what technology) all suffer from something called “self-discharge”, which basically means that if you charge them, and leave them on the shelf, not connected to anything, they will still slowly discharge. The rate at which this happens varies a lot from battery to battery, but generally, manufacturers recommend a full charge every 12 months that a battery is in storage in order to keep it healthy. When people ship you hardware with rechargeable batteries included, you've no way of telling how long the battery has been sitting on a shelf and consequently how much of it's original charge it contains.
Basically, in order to keep the battery healthy, and to make sure you maintain it's full capacity for future use, you need to give it a full charge before use.

Personally, I like to give these things a full charge the first time, then run it completely flat, then give it another full charge – just to keep the battery happy. I guess you already learned the lesson not to skip the seemingly innocuous step of not fully charging the battery before use 🙂

Just be grateful it's not one of those devices that takes 18 hours to perform a full charge.

I have a suggestion for you guys….

Never use technology!

Men, are absolutely useless, and you've just proven how by ignoring simple instructions you make the easiest tasks impossible! If I had been there, that would have turned out completely differently!

Bloody funny though!
😀

Samantha!

Thanks Guys.

Was a pleasure, would be delighted to do it again. Next time, i'll make sure Whatley falls off the back of the bike 😉

Watch out for my podcast with Cynthia Gordon from MTS, was very enlightening even if it was in a big room with muchas echo!

should have read the instructions guys! but it was fun, watching the video and you guys trying to figure out what’s wrong with the device…. keep up the good work! =)

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