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Mobile broadband wireless routers come to T-Mobile

Hitting the stores this week is T-Mobile’s answer to 3’s wireless broadband mobile router, the mouth full that is the Mobile Broadband Share Dock

It works the same way as 3’s Huawei D100 Router, only with a less catchy name. The Share Dock plugs into their mobile broadband dongle, then enables surrounding devices to have ‘net access over its WIFI signal.

Seeing as the T-mobile HSDPA network is shared by 3, you’d have thought this product would have been out there first. The D100 has now had over a month or so advantage to gain its foothold in the marketplace.

How they both balance against each other in costs is of an interest. The T-Mobile offering arrives free on an 18 month contract, at £20 per month for connectivity.

On the 3 offering you have to buy the router at £69.99. On top of that still having to get the mobile broadband dongle plus whatever contract suits your needs. T-mobile bundles in with the Mobile Broadband Share Dock their dongle, creating a more rounded package.

The other consideration to take into mind is their fair usage policy. T-mobile has stipulated it will only be a 3GB data allowance, where 3 have a 5GB on a £15 18 month contract to match their D100.

All told over that 18 month period 3’s deal would come to £340, whereas T-mobiles package would be £360. With 3 of course there would have been an extra 36GB possible data allowance all totalled up.

Seeing as they are both using the same network, the clear winner has to come down to the numbers at the end of the day.

10 replies on “Mobile broadband wireless routers come to T-Mobile”

My mate has 2 modems with T-Mobile so popped into their shop to buy one of these routers, only to be told that they were only available to him if he took out a third contract! Not good customer service imho.

I'm with Dan – firstly, the networks are not yet shared. That's at least a year away.

Secondly, it's only RAN that is shared – the core networks and internet connectivity is separate.

You can have a stonkingly fast air interface, only to be throttled by a rubbish SGSN or IP layer.

And just because you share RAN, does not in any way, shape or means dictate that separate business entities should or will offer similar or the same devices at the same speed, price or service points.

These days, for 95% of the population, coverage is not an issue. And unless you are on O2, mobile broadband speeds are much of a muchness. Networks will leapfrog each other with £GPP releases, but on the whole, speeds are comparable.

Unless you only get coverage from one network, everything mobile “Comes down to the numbers”.

/m

I'm with Dan – firstly, the networks are not yet shared. Trial calls have been made, but widespread integration is not with us yet. That's at least a year away.

Secondly, it's only RAN that is shared – the core networks and internet connectivity is separate.

You can have a stonkingly fast air interface, only to be throttled by a rubbish SGSN or IP layer.

And just because you share RAN, does not in any way, shape or means dictate that separate business entities should or will offer similar or the same devices at the same speed, price or service points.

These days, for 95% of the population, coverage is not an issue. And unless you are on O2, mobile broadband speeds are much of a muchness. Networks will leapfrog each other with £GPP releases, but on the whole, speeds are comparable.

Unless you only get coverage from one network, everything mobile “Comes down to the numbers”.

/m

I'm with Dan – firstly, the networks are not yet shared. Trial calls have been made, but widespread integration is not with us yet. That's at least a year away.

Secondly, it's only RAN that is shared – the core networks and internet connectivity is separate.

You can have a stonkingly fast air interface, only to be throttled by a rubbish SGSN or IP layer.

And just because you share RAN, does not in any way, shape or means dictate that separate business entities should or will offer similar or the same devices at the same speed, price or service points.

These days, for 95% of the population, coverage is not an issue. And unless you are on O2, mobile broadband speeds are much of a muchness. Networks will leapfrog each other with £GPP releases, but on the whole, speeds are comparable.

Unless you only get coverage from one network, everything mobile “Comes down to the numbers”.

/m

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