Terrorist attacks in India underline the personal criticality of mobile

In every single piece of reporting I’ve been reading about the terrorist attacks in India this evening, there’s been some kind of mention of mobile.

One British MEP, Sajjad Karim, has been frequently quoted – here’s an example from The Guardian:

“I was in the lobby of the hotel when gunmen came in and people started running.”

“There were about 25 or 30 of us,” said the Tory MEP, speaking by mobile phone from a barricaded basement room.

“Some of us split one way and some another. A gunman just stood there spraying bullets around, right next to me. I managed to turn away and I ran into the hotel kitchen and then we were shunted into a restaurant in the basement.

The widespread availability of mobiles is making both the reporting far more electric — I really can perceive the sense of panic and concern from the words of Sajjad — I can imagine him talking into his handset telling the world what’s going on as events unfold in front of him.

It sadly takes events such as this to really underline just how connected we all are. This was, after all, thousands of miles away. 15 years ago this would have been a lead story — one item — on the front page of the newspapers. Today, we’re getting imagery, commentary and immediate viewpoints right-away from people on the scene.

We haven’t had to wait for the news anchors to get on the scene. We haven’t had to listen to oodles of speculation. We can get the quotes and the experiences live.

A slight concern I have — quite apart from the human tragedy — is that we appear to be moving to an experiential entertainment form of news.

It is shocking to experience Sajjad’s more-or-less immediate recollection of events. Shocking. But then again I’m sat in a house on a quiet street in the middle of nowhereville, South East of London, where the biggest danger is the ever-present but rare possibility of the aging King Charles Spaniel getting done-in by a Badger at the end of garden whilst she’s out relieving herself.

All the big news sites are touting their ‘eye witness’ services. Reuters, for example, is advertising this service at the bottom of their Mumbai coverage:

Did you witness the attacks? We are inviting citizen photojournalists to send in their best images. If you think your picture captures the moment, please send it to pics@reuters.com.

I haven’t seen any ‘user generated’ footage — video or pictures — on news sites as yet.

But there’s a Wikipedia page up and fully populated — complete with maps of locations. Found this via a ‘twitter Mumbai’ search and hit on Global Dashboard — a site that had breaking links updated already. From there I learnt that there’s a live and dedicated Twitter feed for news and discussion on the attacks here (and another here) with roughly 5 tweets a second being added to each as I write:

Wikipedia is — as one chap comments — crediting Twitter as one of the sources for beraking news on attacks in Mumbai.

An enterprising and helpful person has setup the user, Mumbaiattack, on Twitter — to give a sanitised set of updates free from unnecessary commentary. This, I have subscribed to:

Mahalo is in on the action too with it’s own dedicated page and interactive Google Map and some ‘possible imagery’ of the terrorists — plus links to relevant Twitter users:

The challenge the ‘real’ news sites have got, one imagines, is that you’ve now got access to hundreds of thousands of conversations and experiences. Real. Live. Now.

Which ones are accurate?

If there’s a chap Tweeting from the top floor of the Taj Mahal Hotel balcony — is that genuine or is it an arse sat somewhere in Baltimore having a bit of fun with social media, trying to get on CNN?

I suppose you turn to the likes of Mahalo and Wikipedia who are sourcing from ‘credible’ sources. Mahalo, for example, includes Twitter user, BombayAddcit, as a top source. That’s, I suppose, because he’s got a relevant website attached to his Twitter profile and his Tweet feed looks decent.

I thought I’d try out a bit of mobilising. BombayAddict’s iPhone is at location 18.995453,72.819473 according to his Twitter profile. That’s a Google Maps reference. I stuck that into Google Maps and found that he’s 8.3km away from the Taj Mahal Hotel.

The more communications technology spreads, the more ‘real’ and immediate it all becomes for so many people.

This is both good and bad news.

, , , , , ,

12 Responses to Terrorist attacks in India underline the personal criticality of mobile

  1. tweetip November 26, 2008 at 7:58 pm #

    #Mumbai ~ 1st Tweets Timeline & Chart … http://tweetip.us/lkphd

  2. Deirdre Molloy November 26, 2008 at 8:05 pm #

    Regarding user-created content being used by large media / news outlets, this picture (and posibly more from the particular Flickr set – I haven't checked) was used on Yahoo News shortly after it was published and is now featured in a related Flickr widget on the page http://flickr.com/photos/vinu/3061365143/in/set

    But then Y! do own Flickr… interesting that they sourced it so fast though. I wonder will we get these Flickr widgets across all Yahoo News soon..?

    Another Twitter topic/keyword aggregator that was pumping out about 10-20 updates a second was Roomatic – which was which was set-uo by Russelll beattie (@RussB) as far as I know – see: http://roomatic.com/%23Mumbai

  3. DominicTravers November 27, 2008 at 5:50 am #

    Have see the following in my own feed this morning…

    vinnyflood Indian government asks for live tweets from Mumbai to cease: “PLEASE STOP TWEETING about #Mumbai police and military operations,”

    vinnyflood Would be useful if people could retweet my last message, particularly if you have an Indian followers or friends/family in Mumbai.

    This is a really valid point on this story. There is huge potential for the compromise of the police and military operations ongoing in Mubai, if information on their movements is instantly made public. With this following stories a couple of weeks ago that western security services have concerns that terrorists could use twitter, I dread the news that Mumbai police are lifting mobiles from dead and captured terrorists that all have twitter accounts.

    There is a huge issue here, I know I take the free use of email and messaging services for granted. It takes years for security services to catch up with the technology that most of us are using. I am genuinely concerned that mobile services could be subject to draconian regulation at some point soon. Let's hope the actions of homicidal lunatics doesn't cast a dark shadow over all the good that mobile technology delivers around the world.

  4. Anthony November 27, 2008 at 10:26 am #

    On a sidenote, I found out about the attacks from MIR when checking my RSS feeds with Opera Mini.

  5. Anthony November 27, 2008 at 11:26 am #

    On a sidenote, I found out about the attacks from MIR when checking my RSS feeds with Opera Mini.

  6. nickle slot machines January 20, 2009 at 5:52 am #

    26/11 was the day when we heard that our Metro City Mumbai attacked by the terrorists. Even nobody believes that why they attacked on TAJ HOTEL. I think we have to think that what are the reason behind all the attacks and eventually the term comes to our mind is “PAKISTAN”.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Gaurav Mishra - November 27, 2008

    Thoughtful post on the +ive & -ive role played by mobile phones & Twitter in the Mumbai terrorist attacks http://tr.im/1k19

  2. mirkocorli - November 27, 2008

    link: Terrorist attacks in India underline the personal criticality of mobile http://tinyurl.com/58tol4

  3. Gaurav Mishra - November 27, 2008

    Thoughtful post on the +ive & -ive role played by mobile phones & Twitter in the Mumbai terrorist attacks http://tr.im/1k19

  4. mirkocorli - November 27, 2008

    link: Terrorist attacks in India underline the personal criticality of mobile http://tinyurl.com/58tol4

  5. michael h - November 27, 2008

    hmmm last comment? real/fake true false??? http://tinyurl.com/5kg4dy sounds kinda sticky #mumbai

  6. michael h - November 27, 2008

    hmmm last comment? real/fake true false??? http://tinyurl.com/5kg4dy sounds kinda sticky #mumbai

Leave a Reply

Powered by WordPress. Designed by Woo Themes

Real Time Analytics