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Youth: Text in Knife Crime Concerns

So I’m back to school this week; and during my free lessons, I often find myself aimlessly wandering around. I probably shouldn’t be, as I have mountains of work to do, but it’s certainly more fun.

But it turns out my aimless journeys around my over-crowded school can come in handy… And I came across a poster of major intrigue!

I love mobile services which are useful. Finding services, and then realising whether or not they are useful or not is what I like doing; mainly because it is rare that I will find something that has use far beyond making a company or un-named person a lot of money.

So when I found this poster, I was intrigued.

I doubt I’ll need to remind or inform anyone of the current issues with “Knife Crime” especially in London and Schools. And as a teenager myself I monitor the news locally and nationally to see what is happening. I often find that the government and their pleas to stop knife crime are only just pleas. Having Gordon Brown or any MP for that matter, talking about a subject to do with young people, doesn’t reach many people.

I hear you ask, what about this intriguing poster?

It’s advertising an “anonymous” texting service which can be used to inform the Police about people or persons with Knives.

I think this goes above and beyond what Gordon Brown, the Police Chiefs and the number of other people or institutions have said or done recently. It’s all too easy to say, “We need to get knives off of the street” and that we as citizens – of whatever age – should be doing our best to prevent deaths on the street.

I’ll admit, when I was in lower school I knew of someone who carried a knife, or at least a blade of some nature. There was nothing I could do about it, because I knew the consequence of phoning up the police – getting the boy, and specifically his group of cronies onto me – so I didn’t do it. And I know also many other people were highly aware of the issue too, and as far as I know, no one ever phoned up the police.

And why was that?
The Police come into school, sit you down, talk to you, make an issue of it, and highlight that you’ve highlighted an issue, and therefore it all backfires on you!

The beauty of this service is the anonymity that comes along with it. On the poster we’re told that the number is scrambled, and therefore can’t be traced so no one can reply, and whatever happens as a consequence, the texter cannot be held accountable for it.

That’s what I call brilliant.

What I like more about this service is that it’s gone a bit beyond a poster campaign, and little business-type cards are being handed out to all the lower years. Admittedly, I stole borrowed one of these cards (for research purposes, naturally).

This is what our Government should be doing, what they should be talking about and implementing. And if such a service had been in place say three or four years ago when I was a little Year Eight or Year Nine, when I was thinking “Oh bugger, that boy has a knife”, I certainly would have sent a text.

So I have to applaud the common-sense which has finally kicked in, and I hope that someone uses it.

Any questions, comments, suggestions or anything as usual send them to Samantha@mobileindustryreview.com.

12 replies on “Youth: Text in Knife Crime Concerns”

The fact that mBlox are involved in this doesn't fill me with confidence. But if I were to step back and focus on the idea, I er, still have my doubts…

Texting anonymously is all well and good, but what if the person doing the reporting forgets to delete the message from their 'sent' folder? It's been a while since I were a teenager but I do know one thing, kids pass their phones around all the time and you can't always trust so-called 'friends'. Or at some point they may have their phone stolen from them (possibly by the same group likely to be wandering around with knives).

I guess as long as the person is made aware of this, then this shouldn't be too much of a problem.

If the number truly is scrambled, then I wonder how long it will be before people start falsely accusing people “for a laugh”. I do think this is a great idea though.

Very valid point!

Well, I would imagine that they would investigate cases based on the liklihood of it happening in an area and such… Then again, I don't see the point in that!

Samantha.

Very true!
What constitues as being “fun” to some people is rather bizarre. Falsely accusing someone for a “laugh” certainly isn't fun; but even saying that, I cannot deny it'll probably happen!

Samantha.

Very valid point!

Well, I would imagine that they would investigate cases based on the liklihood of it happening in an area and such… Then again, I don't see the point in that!

Samantha.

Very true!
What constitues as being “fun” to some people is rather bizarre. Falsely accusing someone for a “laugh” certainly isn't fun; but even saying that, I cannot deny it'll probably happen!

Samantha.

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