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Bit of a shame that Scoopt has shut down

I was sent this shut down email from reader Michael who comments:

Victim of the Credit Crunch or too niche to survive?

A bit of both, perhaps? I’m saddened by the closure of Scoopt — if only because it was right there in my ShoZu send-to sites… just in case. JUST in case I happened to be sat in front of a vomiting Michael Jackson. Or Britney Spears ramming her pickup into a wall right in front of me.

Or, perhaps more dramatically, just in case a plane touched down in New York’s Hudson River.

But then again, when that did happen — the chap didn’t send the picture to Scoopt. He sent it to TwitPic.

If you sit and consider this, there’s quite a lot of barriers to success for Scoopt. You need to educate the guy-on-the-ground. He has to be quick thinking enough (and, er, commercial enough) to want to take the picture then send it NOT to his Twitter/Flickr, but to Scoopt only. If you’ve just snapped a plane in the Hudson, chances are you want to tell your friends/followers now. NOt in 20 minutes and not in an hour once the Scoopt machinery has begun.

Ah well.

I’ve still got the BBC News Desk in my ShoZu sites.

Dear Scoopt members,

I am sorry to inform you, as a member of Scoopt, that we have decided to close the business. We will not be taking in any more imagery after February 6, 2009 and will close the upload application. We will also cease licensing any imagery through Scoopt on that date.

Our experience with Scoopt has taught us some very valuable lessons. We remain convinced that there is a demand for this kind of material as part of an editorial product, but for the moment are choosing to focus our energies within Getty Images on our core products in news, sport and entertainment.

It has been a pleasure working with Scoopt, your pictures have provided a fascinating snapshot of the circumstances in which you find yourselves and have added valuable viewpoints to the news service we provide our customers on a daily basis.

A holding page will remain until March 6, 2009 but from February 6 we will not be accepting any new imagery and so the upload path will be closed, and the galleries shut down, at which point all rights over the photos revert to you, the copyright holders.

All Scoopt content that also appears on Getty Images will initially be reviewed and any Scoopt member that has photos deemed to have longer term value on Getty Images will be offered a separate contract. To be clear, on February 6, 2009 all Scoopt content will be taken down from the Getty Images website and only be reposted, once the relevant contractual relationship with individual photographers is in place.

If your material is selected for continued inclusion on Getty Images, you will be contacted directly. We will be posting some FAQ?s on the website to try to answer any questions you may have, so please do refer to this section.

Please note that we will be retaining your contact details in order to service any outstanding payments that are due and in case there should be need for a further communication update. If you would like your details removed from the database, please respond to enquiries@scoopt.com with the words Remove Details in the subject line, and citing your Scoopt member ID.

Please use the email enquiries@scoopt.com for all correspondence regarding the closure of Scoopt

Thank you for all your enthusiasm and support which have made Scoopt such an exciting place to work.

From the team at Scoopt

By Ewan

Ewan is Founder and Editor of Mobile Industry Review. He writes about a wide variety of industry issues and is usually active on Twitter most days. You can read more about him or reach him with these details.

2 replies on “Bit of a shame that Scoopt has shut down”

I think the sell of Scoopt for me was that they would syndicate it and make you some dosh. Putting it onto TwitPic to share is fine, but if The Sun runs it (jesus – how many Twitter degrees of separation am I from a Sun hack?), am I entitled to a licence? Maybe the volume of non-revenue-generating pics and the cost to monitor/filter/action the good ones makes this sort of citizen-journalism-as-income-stream not possible?

/m

I think the sell of Scoopt for me was that they would syndicate it and make you some dosh. Putting it onto TwitPic to share is fine, but if The Sun runs it (jesus – how many Twitter degrees of separation am I from a Sun hack?), am I entitled to a licence? Maybe the volume of non-revenue-generating pics and the cost to monitor/filter/action the good ones makes this sort of citizen-journalism-as-income-stream not possible?

/m

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