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Bluetooth RIP

You’ve got to love bluetooth technologies. I remember when it was merely a way to alert the coffee pot you were near and that it needed to start percolating, and quickly.

Gone are the days when people are struggling to think of applications for it. In fact, if there’s not a CSR bluetooth chip in your phone then it will probably be rather reminiscent of a brick in size, weight and look.

But this may be no more.

Apparently, KDDI has put its super-fast version of the wireless infrared link on display at a Japanese tradeshow just outside Tokyo. The technology, called Giga-IR transmits at 1Gbps, which trounces bluetooth.

According to Tech Radar:

KDDI says it has deliberately targeted a higher class of wireless link to distinguish Giga-IR from Bluetooth and other cable-free rivals.

A spokesperson said, “We aimed at a sharp increase in data rates, considering rates of around 100Mbit/s are not fast enough to differentiate our technology from existing wireless technologies.”

A quick check of my iTunes library, which takes an age to transfer to my phone, suggests that each album comes to 40 or 50MB so would take less than a second to shift across. Indeed, at those speeds, my entire media album would still only take a few seconds to move to a phone.

If it really can transmit at that speed then it puts a whole new slant on recording high quality film too. Simply press record and store it direct to an HDD.

The IRDA created the following to explain the technology. Unfortunately, the organisation forgot words but it vaguely explains it.

3 replies on “Bluetooth RIP”

Problem is, IRDA requires line-of-sight. That is, your send has to be able to see the receiver. Even a bit of paper between them will kill the connection.

Now, you can scatter the IR waves over a wide direction – but it's not as useful as chucking a phone in your backpack and streaming it to earphones.

Problem is, IRDA requires line-of-sight. That is, your send has to be able to see the receiver. Even a bit of paper between them will kill the connection.

Now, you can scatter the IR waves over a wide direction – but it's not as useful as chucking a phone in your backpack and streaming it to earphones.

Problem is, IRDA requires line-of-sight. That is, your send has to be able to see the receiver. Even a bit of paper between them will kill the connection.

Now, you can scatter the IR waves over a wide direction – but it's not as useful as chucking a phone in your backpack and streaming it to earphones.

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