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HSBC placing a 200,000 unit iPhone order?

Reader Tim knocked me over this link from the Boy Genius Report — quoting ZDNet Australia who reckon HSBC is considering dumping Blackberry for iPhone.

The iPhone is most certainly useful now that it’s got Exchange — it does work, and very well. That’s connected the dots for me — contacts sync, calendar sync and so on.

But if there’s any accuracy in this, HSBC are going to have to buy a 800,000 iPhone remote chargers. Enough for 4 each.

One for the bedside.

One for the car.

One for the office.

One for out-and-about.

The iPhone is a super unit for business purposes — in concept. The browser, the maps, the smart, simple easy interface that *anyone* can use… But the battery. Oh dear, the battery…

By Ewan

Ewan is Founder and Editor of Mobile Industry Review. He writes about a wide variety of industry issues and is usually active on Twitter most days. You can read more about him or reach him with these details.

5 replies on “HSBC placing a 200,000 unit iPhone order?”

This sounds very un-HSBC to me, they're quite well known for penny pinching and it's no secret that the iPhone is an expensive piece of kit to own and operate. If this works out then it will be with a pretty impressive subsidy from Apple, plus they'll probably have to somehow disable the fun parts of the phone. Does this mean that Apple are having a hard time shifting units, or are they coming up with a fun-free corporate version of the iPhone?

For any bank to consider the use of the iPhone 3G is rash, at the moment.
There is no encryption, the device is broken within days of a firmware release, the email software does not support many features that Blackberry and competitors have, e.g. out of office notification, update of reply/forward flags, priority flags, message sort or find. There are limited Bluetooth profiles (though this may be seen as an advantage), no printing or document editor, no direct Lotus Notes or Groupwise support. No external keyboard support. Poor 3G and GPS reception (when compared to the E71). The list of other concerns is very extensive.
Yet ease of use and sheer readabilty of the screen may be persuasive enough for some companies, particularly SME's, to make the iPhone 3G a standard tool.
Until Apple evolves the iPhone firmware with secure and productive business features I hope HSBC would not convert their BlackBerry's to iPhones. Perhaps next year though?

For any bank to consider the use of the iPhone 3G is rash, at the moment.
There is no encryption, the device is broken within days of a firmware release, the email software does not support many features that Blackberry and competitors have, e.g. out of office notification, update of reply/forward flags, priority flags, message sort or find. There are limited Bluetooth profiles (though this may be seen as an advantage), no printing or document editor, no direct Lotus Notes or Groupwise support. No external keyboard support. Poor 3G and GPS reception (when compared to the E71). The list of other concerns is very extensive.
Yet ease of use and sheer readabilty of the screen may be persuasive enough for some companies, particularly SME's, to make the iPhone 3G a standard tool.
Until Apple evolves the iPhone firmware with secure and productive business features I hope HSBC would not convert their BlackBerry's to iPhones. Perhaps next year though?

For any bank to consider the use of the iPhone 3G is rash, at the moment.
There is no encryption, the device is broken within days of a firmware release, the email software does not support many features that Blackberry and competitors have, e.g. out of office notification, update of reply/forward flags, priority flags, message sort or find. There are limited Bluetooth profiles (though this may be seen as an advantage), no printing or document editor, no direct Lotus Notes or Groupwise support. No external keyboard support. Poor 3G and GPS reception (when compared to the E71). The list of other concerns is very extensive.
Yet ease of use and sheer readabilty of the screen may be persuasive enough for some companies, particularly SME's, to make the iPhone 3G a standard tool.
Until Apple evolves the iPhone firmware with secure and productive business features I hope HSBC would not convert their BlackBerry's to iPhones. Perhaps next year though?

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