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UK operators worried about rumoured WiMax entrant

That’s four people and Unstrung who have mentioned a UK WiMax entrant hunting for spectrum in the UK.

Ye plot, it doth thicken, M’Lord.

Link: Unstrung – T-Mobile Challenges Ofcom – Wireless Bits

That’s certainly plausible, but if you’re inclined to entertain conspiracy theories, this one is good: Spectrum refarming is not the issue. T-Mobile and the other mobile operators are actually more worried about a new WiMax player coming into their market, so they’re doing their best to delay the 2.6GHz auction to prevent a new entrant from getting their hands on the new spectrum.

5 COMMENTS

  1. I'm not sure why they are even bothering to try and delay the auction. I'm sure the government will do a pretty good job of plucking the whole thing up anyway.

    WiMax is the new 'Edge' isn't it? Out of date, before it even arrives……

  2. Pah.

    2.6GHz? MNO's afraid? What_is Unstrung_smoking?

    Look at all the problems Muni-Fi has delivering at 2.4GHz (OK, not quite comparable due to max TX power, but there is a correlation). At the time when everyone (apart from the UK) is refarming like crazy to get 3G at sub-1GHz frequencies, people are apparently scared of a 2.6GHz entrant?

    The UK's biggest MNO's had to deploy circa 6-7000 Macro sites to get to around 80-90% population. Other MNO's have deployed fewer, and hence have less coverage. And 3G in-building coverage, on average, is not great. These networks were planned for outdoor service, and now with everyone using dongles inside, on their laps, it's a challenge to serve customers what they expect.

    OK, let's assume a WiMax dongle is available at a similar cost to a 3.5G one (whole different issue there). Fine. And they have a retail partner. OK. Customer buys (maybe online) and goes home to bedsit in suburban Reading. Plugs in. Turns on. Aaaaaaand….

    Somewhere nearby, but not more than about a mile away at 2.6GHz / WiMax-standards licenced TX emission, there needs to be a WiMax basestation. With a mast. And an antenna. And backhaul. And air-conditioning. And a property lease. And a tech in a white van on hand if it breaks. and a level 3 ISP deal. And a licence to operate. And a call centre.

    Now, multiply this by many thousands of times to get even half-arsed mass-market coverage.

    Hope you've got a decent chequebook, because that is a multi-Billion pound, 3-year minimum rollout puppy you've just spec'd.

    Oh, and while you were building that, the 3.5G networks just got bumped to HSPA Evolution, with real bitrates circa 20MBps.

    But of course this won't stop some VC wet-behind-the-ears from pouring half a hedge into the idea. The MNO's likely biggest fear? Bleeding experienced staff to the new entrant.

    /m

  3. Pah.

    2.6GHz? MNO's afraid? What_is Unstrung_smoking?

    Look at all the problems Muni-Fi has delivering at 2.4GHz (OK, not quite comparable due to max TX power, but there is a correlation). At the time when everyone (apart from the UK) is refarming like crazy to get 3G at sub-1GHz frequencies, people are apparently scared of a 2.6GHz entrant?

    The UK's biggest MNO's had to deploy circa 6-7000 Macro sites to get to around 80-90% population. Other MNO's have deployed fewer, and hence have less coverage. And 3G in-building coverage, on average, is not great. These networks were planned for outdoor service, and now with everyone using dongles inside, on their laps, it's a challenge to serve customers what they expect.

    OK, let's assume a WiMax dongle is available at a similar cost to a 3.5G one (whole different issue there). Fine. And they have a retail partner. OK. Customer buys (maybe online) and goes home to bedsit in suburban Reading. Plugs in. Turns on. Aaaaaaand….

    Somewhere nearby, but not more than about a mile away at 2.6GHz / WiMax-standards licenced TX emission, there needs to be a WiMax basestation. With a mast. And an antenna. And backhaul. And air-conditioning. And a property lease. And a tech in a white van on hand if it breaks. and a level 3 ISP deal. And a licence to operate. And a call centre.

    Now, multiply this by many thousands of times to get even half-arsed mass-market coverage.

    Hope you've got a decent chequebook, because that is a multi-Billion pound, 3-year minimum rollout puppy you've just spec'd.

    Oh, and while you were building that, the 3.5G networks just got bumped to HSPA Evolution, with real bitrates circa 20MBps.

    But of course this won't stop some VC wet-behind-the-ears from pouring half a hedge into the idea. The MNO's likely biggest fear? Bleeding experienced staff to the new entrant.

    /m

  4. I'm not sure why they are even bothering to try and delay the auction. I'm sure the government will do a pretty good job of plucking the whole thing up anyway.

    WiMax is the new 'Edge' isn't it? Out of date, before it even arrives……

  5. Pah.

    2.6GHz? MNO's afraid? What_is Unstrung_smoking?

    Look at all the problems Muni-Fi has delivering at 2.4GHz (OK, not quite comparable due to max TX power, but there is a correlation). At the time when everyone (apart from the UK) is refarming like crazy to get 3G at sub-1GHz frequencies, people are apparently scared of a 2.6GHz entrant?

    The UK's biggest MNO's had to deploy circa 6-7000 Macro sites to get to around 80-90% population. Other MNO's have deployed fewer, and hence have less coverage. And 3G in-building coverage, on average, is not great. These networks were planned for outdoor service, and now with everyone using dongles inside, on their laps, it's a challenge to serve customers what they expect.

    OK, let's assume a WiMax dongle is available at a similar cost to a 3.5G one (whole different issue there). Fine. And they have a retail partner. OK. Customer buys (maybe online) and goes home to bedsit in suburban Reading. Plugs in. Turns on. Aaaaaaand….

    Somewhere nearby, but not more than about a mile away at 2.6GHz / WiMax-standards licenced TX emission, there needs to be a WiMax basestation. With a mast. And an antenna. And backhaul. And air-conditioning. And a property lease. And a tech in a white van on hand if it breaks. and a level 3 ISP deal. And a licence to operate. And a call centre.

    Now, multiply this by many thousands of times to get even half-arsed mass-market coverage.

    Hope you've got a decent chequebook, because that is a multi-Billion pound, 3-year minimum rollout puppy you've just spec'd.

    Oh, and while you were building that, the 3.5G networks just got bumped to HSPA Evolution, with real bitrates circa 20MBps.

    But of course this won't stop some VC wet-behind-the-ears from pouring half a hedge into the idea. The MNO's likely biggest fear? Bleeding experienced staff to the new entrant.

    /m

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