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Mobile Digg sites begin rivalry

Earlier this year Ricky posted a piece on CellphoneNews2.com, a Digg-esque site for mobile, where users can ‘create a free account and digg up or bury news stories, thereby affecting what shows up on the main page.’

According to the web ranking site Quantcast the site has begun to take off recently but it may have some competition on its hands in the form of Mobibu.

According to the site: “Mobibu is a user-powered news portal for the latest mobile phone, smartphone, palm, pocket pc and gadgets industry featuring mobile phone news, reviews, software, industry trends and opinion.”

The site’s owners also contacted us to highlight it commenting :

On this social content voting site, all news is submitted by its users. Most members are generally mobile phone bloggers. Any members can submit latest mobile phone related content to Mobibu.com, and this will enable the content to be viewed by all. The content will be promoted or buried depending on how much it is liked by the community. The more votes the submission gets, the more popular it is. With enough votes, the piece of news will be showcased on the main page of Mobibu.com.

From what I can see the two sites do identical things but more thought has been put into the Mobibu design. There’s very little admin so both will probably take off to a reasonable extent. But, we’re still talking 10s – 100s of votes rather than the level on Digg which saw 1402 votes for April’s Firefox goes mobile story.

3 replies on “Mobile Digg sites begin rivalry”

Cell Phone News 2.0 has now had a design update, which should improve matters considerably.

There is a substantial difference between the two sites though. Mobibu depends on user submissions, while Cell Phone News 2.0 mostly depends on RSS feeds from over 300 cell phone blogs and news sites (although it also allows user submissions).

For Mobibu this means that, in theory, users will only submit novel or useful articles. The downside is that it means that news items arrive late, sometimes never. Mobibu, at the time of writing has four (yes, four)submissions from the last two days.

Cell Phone News 2.0's automated system means that hundreds of news items are submitted every day. The disadvantage of this is that there is a certain level of junk postings when bloggers discuss what they had for breakfast. However, it does mean that *every* topic gets covered and in depth. It is a far more useful research tool. For casual readers, the front page obviously provides an easy way to keep up to date with everything of interest in the cell phone world.

The new version also allows members to add blogs to a favourites list, so they can keep track of many blogs in one place, and there is even a 'save' function for individual useful articles.

One more substantial difference between the two is that Cell Phone News 2.0 uses direct links to the articles, wheras Mobibu forces users to visit the individual article summary page before they can click through to the full article.

Cell Phone News 2.0 has now had a design update, which should improve matters considerably.

There is a substantial difference between the two sites though. Mobibu depends on user submissions, while Cell Phone News 2.0 mostly depends on RSS feeds from over 300 cell phone blogs and news sites (although it also allows user submissions).

For Mobibu this means that, in theory, users will only submit novel or useful articles. The downside is that it means that news items arrive late, sometimes never. Mobibu, at the time of writing has four (yes, four)submissions from the last two days.

Cell Phone News 2.0's automated system means that hundreds of news items are submitted every day. The disadvantage of this is that there is a certain level of junk postings when bloggers discuss what they had for breakfast. However, it does mean that *every* topic gets covered and in depth. It is a far more useful research tool. For casual readers, the front page obviously provides an easy way to keep up to date with everything of interest in the cell phone world.

The new version also allows members to add blogs to a favourites list, so they can keep track of many blogs in one place, and there is even a 'save' function for individual useful articles.

One more substantial difference between the two is that Cell Phone News 2.0 uses direct links to the articles, wheras Mobibu forces users to visit the individual article summary page before they can click through to the full article.

Cell Phone News 2.0 has now had a design update, which should improve matters considerably.

There is a substantial difference between the two sites though. Mobibu depends on user submissions, while Cell Phone News 2.0 mostly depends on RSS feeds from over 300 cell phone blogs and news sites (although it also allows user submissions).

For Mobibu this means that, in theory, users will only submit novel or useful articles. The downside is that it means that news items arrive late, sometimes never. Mobibu, at the time of writing has four (yes, four)submissions from the last two days.

Cell Phone News 2.0's automated system means that hundreds of news items are submitted every day. The disadvantage of this is that there is a certain level of junk postings when bloggers discuss what they had for breakfast. However, it does mean that *every* topic gets covered and in depth. It is a far more useful research tool. For casual readers, the front page obviously provides an easy way to keep up to date with everything of interest in the cell phone world.

The new version also allows members to add blogs to a favourites list, so they can keep track of many blogs in one place, and there is even a 'save' function for individual useful articles.

One more substantial difference between the two is that Cell Phone News 2.0 uses direct links to the articles, wheras Mobibu forces users to visit the individual article summary page before they can click through to the full article.

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