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Broadcom develops 802.11n chip for mobiles

A chipset has been unveiled by Broadcom, enabling WIFI in the shape of 802.11n for mobile phones.

Along with the new wireless network standard it also rocks up with FM radio onboard and Bluetooth, making it a strong all round contender for the next wave of handsets.

The ever so imaginatively entitled BCM4329 offers all this up without impacting on battery life and size, which is more than can be said for some we’re led to believe.

With a stat hitting us that in 2012, one third of all wireless devices shipping will be mobile phones it just goes to show how much of an impact handsets do have on the WIFI chipset market.

Broadcom also made a commitment of late to bring out a new chip every 60 days, so expect more of this nature to be on the horizon driving handset development.

With 802.11n being capable of 50 Mbit/s, with a typical throughput of 19 Mbit/s this is a good development and a darn welcome one at that. Hurrah!

The faster the downloading speed for files equals less power used over time on the handset, all making for a good combination in our book.

The BCM4329 also has both an FM transmitter onboard, besides that of a regular receiver. Effectively turning your mobile phone into a radio station, which some of the Sony Ericssons already do have we believe. Double Hurrah!

Broadcom are expecting the chip to hit production lines in 2009, so get ordering guys. We want to see 802.11n in phones today!

4 replies on “Broadcom develops 802.11n chip for mobiles”

Without impacting battery life? Really? That's a mighty big promise!

Colour me sceptical though – the bottleneck in getting data from point A to a phone is usually the device OS itself… or the back-end 'net connection… or the serving application.

Also, downloading faster doesn't mean you will save battery. Intelligent software design is the best way to save battery life on Wi-Fi. Wi-Fi suffers because it is always “on” (unlike GSM which drops into a low power mode until paged).

My final concern is that I barely see manufacturers advertising 802.11G – its just Wi-Fi. I wonder if N will really be a differentiator.

Without impacting battery life? Really? That's a mighty big promise!

Colour me sceptical though – the bottleneck in getting data from point A to a phone is usually the device OS itself… or the back-end 'net connection… or the serving application.

Also, downloading faster doesn't mean you will save battery. Intelligent software design is the best way to save battery life on Wi-Fi. Wi-Fi suffers because it is always “on” (unlike GSM which drops into a low power mode until paged).

My final concern is that I barely see manufacturers advertising 802.11G – its just Wi-Fi. I wonder if N will really be a differentiator.

YES my company is making an app which will make it so you can also tune into stations online but they will than be resent to others in about a 3 mile radious as AM!
(So all people by the chip can see who is listening to what)

YES my company is making an app which will make it so you can also tune into stations online but they will than be resent to others in about a 3 mile radious as AM!
(So all people by the chip can see who is listening to what)

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